NPR

What's The 5-Year-Survival Rate For Cancer Patients Around The World?

A new study looks at patient records for a variety of cancers from 71 countries. Some of the data is encouraging — and some is discouraging.
Chemotherapy has made a tremendous difference in survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common type of childhood cancer. Source: FatCamera

What happens after a cancer diagnosis?

That's the question investigated by a study published by the CONCORD program on cancer survival published on Tuesday in The Lancet. The study looks at patient records for adults and children diagnosed with a variety of cancers in 71 countries. The records are from 2010 to 2014. The goal is to compare five-year survival rates, a number used to assess effectiveness of treatment.

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