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Exclusive: DC Marks 'Action' #1000 With New Book

Why we did, and still, need Superman.
action-comics-1000-display Source: DC Comics

Comic books were never meant to last. In the early 20th century, they were disposable, the lowest of the low arts: garish and lurid, printed on pulpy newsprint with smeared colors, produced by exploitative publishers and read by mindless children and degenerate adults. 

But on April 18, 1938, everything changed:  #1 hit newsstands and the world was introduced to Superman. Created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster—two young guys out of Cleveland—the character was so primal, so evocative, so—our pop culture landscape would be unrecognizable.

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