Apple Magazine

DNA-GATHERING VACUUM, 3-D LASER SCANNER AMONG OMAHA POLICE’S TOOLS AS DETECTIVE WORK GETS EVEN MORE HIGH-TECH

Gone are the days of strictly old-school detective work.

Omaha police can now collect more DNA from cold-case evidence and analyze data from smart watches, homes and vehicles.

The department also may acquire software allowing detectives to walk through a crime scene in virtual reality so they can examine angles, search for clues and see a witness’s viewpoint.

While detectives have been able to search cellphones and swab for DNA for years, technology for both electronic and physical forensics has advanced even further — securing solid evidence that can aid law enforcement

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Apple Magazine

Apple Magazine3 min read
California Outlines Ways To Comply With Upcoming Privacy Law
Companies must notify California residents of their data privacy rights in plain language and must verify people’s identities before releasing data, state officials proposed. California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced draft regulations that
Apple Magazine3 min read
Google Touts Privacy Options, But Still Depends On Your Data
Google’s latest phone and smart-home devices came packaged with a not-so-subtle message: Google cares about your privacy. Does it? The tech company has had a complicated relationship with user information in the past. Google’s latest steps offer cons
Apple Magazine2 min readTech
German 5g Rules Avoid Huawei Ban; Us Warns On Intel Sharing
Germany released draft security guidelines for next generation wireless networks that stopped short of banning Huawei, as the U.S. warned again it would reconsider intelligence sharing with allies that use the Chinese company’s equipment. The Federal