The New York Times

The Women Behind White Power

THE HISTORY OF THE NATION’S RACISM LETS ITS MOST EFFECTIVE FOOT SOLDIERS OFF THE HOOK.

Few Americans know the name Cornelia Dabney Tucker, but the Jim Crow South would not have been the same without her.

After the Supreme Court issued its 1954 decision in Brown v. Board of Education, ending public-school segregation, Senator James Eastland, the cigar-smoking chairman of the Senate Judicial Committee, turned to Mrs. Tucker to help aid him in his two-pronged assault on the decision. While Mr. Eastland wielded his chairmanship to counter civil rights, delaying, for example, the 1967 vote to confirm Thurgood Marshall, the first black Supreme Court justice, he counted

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