Bloomberg Businessweek

Airbus Outgrows Its European Nest

There’s pressure to shift work away from its home base to win political favor in new markets

Since it was cobbled together from a passel of national aerospace groups a half-century ago, Airbus SE has spread its operations across Europe in a delicate effort aimed at maximizing political expediency without sacrificing too much economic efficiency. There’s little industrial logic, after all, in shuttling airplane parts among 14 factories in a half-dozen countries, with some wing components crossing the English Channel nine times before being mounted on planes. Yet it makes perfect sense if you want the backing of governments seeking jobs for their workers. Today, with Brexit looming, the quid pro quo is poised to become more complicated as the plane maker faces growing pressure from

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