The New York Times

How Dental Inequality Hurts Americans

Even before any proposed cuts take effect, Medicaid is already lean in one key area: Many state programs lack coverage for dental care.

That can be bad news not only for people’s overall well-being, but also for their ability to find and keep a job.

Not being able to see a dentist is related to a range of health problems. Periodontal disease (gum infection) is associated with an increased risk of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In part, this reflects how people with oral health problems tend to be less healthy in other ways; diabetes and smoking, for instance, increase the chances of cardiovascular problems and

This article originally appeared in .

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