The Atlantic

The Shape of Ancient Dice Suggests Shifting Beliefs in Fate and Chance

Roman dice were often visibly biased, but that might not have mattered to someone who believed in divine intervention.
Source: Alexander Demianchuk / Reuters

Dice, in their standard six-sided form, seem like the simplest kind of device—almost a classic embodiment of chance. But a new study of more than 100 examples from the last 2,000 years or so unearthed in the Netherlands shows that they have not always looked exactly the way they do now. What’s more, the shifts in dice’s appearance may reflect people’s changing sense of what exactly is behind a roll—fate, or probability.

Dice have been found all over Europe, says Jelmer Eerkens, an archaeologist at the University of California at Davis,

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