Women's Health

THIS IS FASTING?

A mere five years ago, skipping meals was a top diet taboo. Now it’s the core of an increasingly popular (and increasingly research-backed) weight-loss approach. Intermittent fasting—periodically eating very little—is not only not bad for you, it may lower blood glucose levels and insulin resistance and reduce inflammation and cardiovascular risk. Why? How? Theories abound, but some experts believe fasting puts your cells under mild stress, just as exercise taxes your muscles and heart, ultimately strengthening them and making them more resistant to disease.

And that’s not all, says Courtney Peterson, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the department of nutrition sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “Studies suggest you keep more muscle and lose more fat than on other diets, even if you lose the same number of pounds.” That’s because after about 12 hours

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