Popular Science

Star Trek, James Bond, and the trip from science fiction to science fact

Excerpt: The Edumacation Book

robotic hand and butterfly

Some technology inspired by science fiction is now part of our lives today.

The following is an excerpt adapted from The Edumacation Book: Amazing Cocktail-Party Science to Impress Your Friends by Andy McElfresh.

Here’s my misspent youth: I spent many, many hours in a camping hammock behind my parents’ house devouring the Science Fiction Hall of Fame series, everything by Arthur C. Clarke, many things by Robert Heinlein, the complete works of Philip K. Dick, and especially issues of the short-lived Galileo magazine. I also read Asimov’s Science Fiction magazine, which was a lot like Alfred Hitchcock’s Suspense Magazine, but with ray guns and the peculiar feature of having a different photo of Isaac Asimov in the upper left corner on each issue. One photo was of Asimov’s feet.

edumacation cover

The Edumacation Book: Amazing Cocktail-Party Science to Impress Your Friends by Andy McElfresh, forward by Kevin Smith is available on March 20, 2018.

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