Los Angeles Times

What you can learn about marriage and migration from a 13 million-member family tree

It's not the biggest family tree in the world, but it's close.

Armchair genealogists and a team of computers scientists have assembled a massive family tree that includes 13 million individual members and spans an average of 11 generations.

A study describing the tree, published this week in Science, also details some of what we can learn from this crowdsourced data. For example, it reveals when people stopped marrying their cousins, whether men or women traveled farther from home for

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