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Fishing Boats 'Going Dark' Raise Suspicion Of Illegal Catches, Report Says

A new report by the international conservation group Oceana highlights several incidents of fishing vessels switching off their Automatic Identification System beacons in no-take fishing areas.
Fisherman loading a catch into baskets at sea aboard a Spanish boat. Two vessels flying the Spanish flag were signaled out for "going dark" in a new report issued by the conservation group Oceana. Source: Marcel Mochet

A new report raises concerns that when fishing vessels "go dark" by switching off electronic tracking devices, in many cases they are doing so to mask the taking of illegal catches in protected marine parks and restricted national waters.

In the released Monday by , an international conservation group, authors Lacey Malarky and Beth Lowell document incidents of fishing vessels that disappear from computer screens as they shut

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