The Atlantic

Theresa May Gives Putin a 48-Hour Deadline

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May used unusually strong terms to link Russia to the poisoning of a former spy on British soil, but left open the question of what happens next.
Source: Markus Schreiber / AP

Russian operations in the West—or rather, Russian operations in the West—are designed in part for deniability. From election meddling in the United States to mysterious poisonings in the United Kingdom, the Russian connection has been visible through hints, happenstance, digital trails, or clear motives, but always hard to prove. Which leaves Western governments in the position of deciding when, and how, to make public accusations.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic9 min readPolitics
Don’t Use These Free Speech Arguments Ever Again
Most speech, hateful or not, is protected by the Constitution. To pretend otherwise is foolhardy.
The Atlantic3 min read
Ready or Not Is a Clever Horror Comedy About Entitled Rich People
The new film retells a classic story of bored aristocrats hunting humans—with a subversive twist.
The Atlantic3 min readPolitics
Emmanuel Macron Expounds as the World Burns
It was a perfect late-summer evening when President Emmanuel Macron—tanned and super-energized in a dark-blue suit and crisp white shirt—held forth before the Elysée press corps on matters of international import. Posh Paris was largely out of town.