The Millions

David Foster Wallace and the Horror of Neuroscience

1.
Despite never writing about it directly, explicitly—the way he wrote about cruise ships or Roger Federer or the eating of lobsters—David Foster Wallace had a keen and lifelong interest in the brain. There was an obvious personal reason for this: on most of the days of his life, he consumed brain-altering chemicals as a way to stave off suicidal depression. His first published short story is essentially an extended musing on the connections between chemicals, the brain, and subjective wellbeing. These interests continue to animate his early works; both The Broom of the System (1987) and Girl with Curious Hair (1989) are peppered with offhand but learned references to neuroanatomy. Paul D. MacLean’s once-popular triune brain theory appears in Infinite Jest, and there are also quieter references to Gilbert Ryle and Julian Jaynes—two other well-known theorists of the relations between neurology and the mind. As Wallace scholar Stephen J. Burn has put it, analyzing The Pale King (2011), Wallace nurtured a “career-long fascination with consciousness.”

His 2004 short-story collection Oblivion has always been a somewhat confusing book: dense, obtuse, cold, fragmented, a little cruel. However, while penning a PhD thesis on the intersections between neuroscience, theories of consciousness, and modern Anglo-American literature—a Wallacian labyrinth of thought if ever there was one—I think I have come to understand Oblivion for what it really is: A work of horror fiction, whose unique brand of horror is rooted in Wallace’s reading about the brain.

In the eight years between and , Wallace’s reading in neuroscience and consciousness studies intensified. His essay “Consider the Lobster,” published almost in tandem with , displays a sophistication of engagement with neuroscience that outstrips any of his previous work, referencing nociceptors and prostaglandins Centre at UT in Austin): the Danish popular science writer ’s , and ’s . Wallace read both of these works of popular consciousness studies closely, and what he took from them is revealed by his annotations. In Nørretranders’s , Wallace has heavily underlined a section where Nørretranders writes “Consciousness is a fraud.” On another page Nørretranders has written “Most of what we experience, we can never tell each other about—we can share the experience that through language we are unable to share most of what we experience.” In his copy, Wallace has underlined this paragraph, and written, at the top of the page, “Loneliness—Can’t Talk About It.” In Wilson’s , alongside Wilson’s remark that “Freud’s vision of the unconscious was far too limited,” Wallace’s scribbled note reads “omniscient not on conscious thought but on ” []. Most of what we think of as self-directed behavior, explains Wilson, may well be actually “non-conscious intention.”

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Millions

The Millions2 min read
Olga Tokarczuk and Peter Handke Win Nobel Prizes in Literature
Olga Tokarczuk and Peter Handke were awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. The post Olga Tokarczuk and Peter Handke Win Nobel Prizes in Literature appeared first on The Millions.
The Millions19 min read
Unsettling the American Dream: The Millions Interviews Viet Thanh Nguyen
I couldn't pay attention to that, not to write the novel I wanted to write. We can't let our work be driven by the anxieties around narrative scarcity. The post Unsettling the American Dream: The Millions Interviews Viet Thanh Nguyen appeared first o
The Millions6 min read
Tuesday New Release Day: Smith, Jones, Jemc, Dancyger, Marantz
Zadie Smith headlines a new week of new books, including essays by angry women and an excellent exploration of the rise of the online alt-right. The post Tuesday New Release Day: Smith, Jones, Jemc, Dancyger, Marantz appeared first on The Millions.