The New York Times

In Poor Countries, Anti-Smoking Activists Face Threats and Violence

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

Six years ago, more than a dozen men with AK-47s shot their way into Akinbode Oluwafemi’s home in Lagos, Nigeria. They killed his house guard and his brother-in-law, and briefly held a muzzle to the head of one of his year-old twins.

“I do not know why I was not killed that day,” said Oluwafemi, who as deputy director of Environmental Rights Action/Friends of the Earth Nigeria has been one of his country’s leading anti-smoking activists.

He was one of several tobacco control advocates at the recent 17th World Conference on Tobacco or Health in Cape

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