The New York Times

The Bomber Is Dead, but Fear of Racist Attacks Lives On

EAST AUSTIN RESIDENTS SAY THEIR PROGRESSIVE CITY HAS A BLIND SPOT WHEN IT COMES TO RACE.

Austin, Tex. — Were the Austin bombings racially motivated? The suspect is dead, and we may never know for sure. Whatever the investigation yields, the bombings will forever feel like terror to the city’s longstanding African-American and Latino residents. They are reminded once again that the narrative of Austin’s exceptionalism — the notion of the city as a politically progressive and countercultural oasis in the deep, conservative south — never

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