Nautilus

The Key to Good Luck Is an Open Mind

Demystifying the luck skillset has been a personal project of Christine Carter, a sociologist and senior fellow at the Greater Good Science Center, at U.C. Berkeley.Photograph by Zoltán Vörös / Flickr

Luck can seem synonymous with randomness. To call someone lucky is usually to deny the relevance of their hard work or talent. As Richard Wiseman, the Professor of Public Understanding of Psychology at the University of Hertfordshire, in the United Kingdom, puts it, lucky people “appear to have an uncanny ability to be in the right place at the right time and enjoy more than their fair share of lucky breaks.”

What do these people have that the rest

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