History of War

MAJOR HERBERT ‘BLONDIE’ HASLER, DSO & THE COCKLESHELL HEROES

Source:   Former member of the wartime French resistance Clodomir Pasqueraud (right) presenting Major Herbert Hasler (1914-1987) with a bottle of cognac at a reception at the Royal Marines Volunteer Reserve headquarters, Shepherds Bush, London, 16 June 1961  

A limpet mine, similar to those used during the operation

These contain corrosive acid of different strengths for detonating mines. The colour of the ampoule defines the time that the fuse takes to activate. In five degrees temperature, the red ampoule takes six and a half hours to detonate the mine, while the violet takes eight and a half days. The ampoule breaks when it is placed in the mine, corroding the metal that holds the explosive charge

 A keen sportsman, Blondie was

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