History of War

STORMING SAN JUAN HEIGHTS

Source:   Color Sergeant George Berry of Troop G, Tenth US Cavalry Regiment, carries the national flag of his own command as well as the standard of the Third US Cavalry Regiment in the assault upon the Spanish works on Kettle Hill, San Juan Heights  

“MOST OF THE AMERICAN CAVALRYMEN HAD REACHED CUBA WITHOUT THEIR MOUNTS AND WOULD BE FORCED TO FIGHT THE COMING BATTLE FOR SAN JUAN HEIGHTS AS INFANTRYMEN”

the morning of 1 July 1898, American soldiers of the Fifth Army Corps, commanded by Major General William Shafter, surveyed the heights surrounding Santiago de Cuba, Cuba’s second largest city. The Americans had come ashore days earlier at Daiquiri and initiated an expedition against the Spanish stronghold, where General Arsenio

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