Popular Science

Appalachians are slow to adopt new technology for a surprising (and refreshing) reason

We have a lot to learn from folks who resist the latest gadgets.
an old fashioned rotary phone on a table

Not everyone wants to be an early adopter.

When people hear “Appalachia,” stereotypes and even slurs often immediately jump to mind, words like “backwards,” “ignorant,” “hillbilly” or “yokel.” But Appalachian attitudes about technology’s role in daily life are extremely sophisticated—and turn out to be both insightful and useful in a technology-centric society.

Many Americans tend to view Appalachian life as involving deprivation and deficit. This can be particularly pointed regarding technology: Rural residents are frequently neglected in research on technology use, and where they are included, the data usually focus on the and use of smartphones and laptop computers in rural areas. Articles can come across as scholars and reporters , “Poor rural Appalachians—they don’t even own the newest

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