The New York Times

Will We Stop Trump Before It's Too Late?

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.

FASCISM POSES A MORE SERIOUS THREAT NOW THAN AT ANY TIME SINCE THE END OF WORLD WAR II.

On April 28, 1945 — 73 years ago — Italians hung the corpse of their former dictator Benito Mussolini upside down next to a gas station in Milan. Two days later, Adolf Hitler committed suicide in his bunker beneath the streets of war-ravaged Berlin. Fascism, it appeared, was dead.

To guard against a recurrence, the survivors of war and the Holocaust joined forces to create the United Nations, forge global financial institutions and — through the Universal Declaration of Human Rights — strengthen the rule of law. In 1989, the Berlin Wall came down and the honor

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