The Atlantic

Beverly Cleary at 95: A Talk With the Author Who Created Ramona Quimby

The young-adult novelist discusses her childhood, the Internet, and the enduring appeal of her books
Source: Alan McEwan / Courtesy of Harper Collins

In this month's Atlantic magazine, literary editor Benjamin Schwarz delves into the work of children's book author Beverly Cleary, whose books have sold more than 91 million copies since her first, Henry Huggins, was published in 1950. Best known for her stories about Ramona Quimby, her sister Beezus, and their friend Henry, Cleary has written more than 40 books, creating what Schwarz calls "one of the most enduring and influential bodies of work in American fiction."

Cleary, who turned 95 in April, recently answered some of our questions, including her thoughts about writing as a young mother, how she feels about the Internet, and why her midcentury characters appeal to modern children.


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