The Atlantic

An Attack on the Rule of Law

President Trump’s attacks on American institutions are forcing a fight for the integrity of our system of self-rule.
Source: Jonathan Ernst / Reuters

Verbal red lines have become all too common in American politics. They’re declared against foreign adversaries as readily as they are in budget battles. And in most cases, the line drawers redraw their boundaries when they are traversed and action is required.

That’s partly why the barrage of warnings senators and representatives are sending to President Trump, in defense of Special Counsel Robert Mueller, can inspire only modest confidence. To fire Mueller would be “political suicide,” they’ve warned. It would be “a disaster” and he should be

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