Runner's World

THE RUN-TO-LOSE PROBLEM

IN 2011, ALLIE KIEFFER ran a 4:40.9 mile and placed third in the USA Track & Field Indoor Championships 3,000-meter event. She was fast. But she wanted to be faster.

“We often hear that to run faster, you should lose weight,” Kieffer says. At 17 percent body fat, the now 30-year-old was already lean, but “everyone seemed leaner than me.” So, as she made the jump to the elite scene, Kieffer began cutting calories and fat. She lost 10 pounds and qualified for the upcoming Olympic Trials. She also developed a stress reaction in her tibia. Not only did running hurt, butin the 2012 Olympic Trials, and Kieffer didn’t run competitively again for nearly three years.

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