Los Angeles Times

The more humans spread across the globe, the smaller other mammals get

LOS ANGELES_Thirteen thousand years ago Southern California was crawling with enormous mammals - all of which are extinct today.

There were massive mammoths three times bigger than modern-day elephants, giant ground sloths up to 20 feet in length, and strange, armadillo-like beasts known as glyptodons that were roughly the size of a VW bus.

And don't forget the llamas, camels, dire wolves, cave lions and saber-toothed cats that all called the area home as well.

Today, the largest local land mammal is the bighorn sheep, which weighs about 300 pounds.

And a similar trend can be found on

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