The New York Times

What Hospitals Can Teach the Police

MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS KNOW HOW TO DE-ESCALATE VOLATILE SITUATIONS.

When a police officer in Cambridge, Mass., punched a black male Harvard student in the stomach multiple times while subduing him this month, the nation was reminded yet again of how quickly confrontations between the police and civilians can intensify beyond what the situation seems to call for. (The student was naked in public and apparently behaving erratically.)

Much of the recent conversation about police violence in the United States has focused — quite rightly — on concerns about racism and the flagrant abuse of power. But even when law enforcement seems to be acting in good faith, there is a

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