NPR

Study: Colleges That Ditch The SAT And ACT Can Enhance Diversity

A new study confirms what some researchers have been saying for decades — standardized tests have little or no value in predicting students' success in college. So why do institutions use them?
Source: LA Johnson

There are now well over 1,000 colleges and universities that don't require SAT or ACT scores in deciding whom to admit, a number that's growing every year. And a new study finds that scores on those tests are of little value in predicting students' performance in college, and raises the question: Should those tests be required at all?

Colleges that have gone "test optional" enroll — and graduate — a higher proportion of

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