The Atlantic

Afghanistan Takes a Bloody Path to Pursue Peace

The recent carnage notwithstanding, the government has called for talks with the Taliban.
Source: Omar Sobhani / Reuters

The years keep passing with the United States in Afghanistan—nearly 17 in all now—and the death toll keeps climbing. This week it was twin suicide bombings in Kabul that killed 25 people, including nine journalists, plus an attack on a military convoy in the country’s south that wounded several Romanian service members and killed an unknown number of children nearby. American soldiers, too, despite having drawn down their presence, continue to die there—two of them have been killed in the country this year, most recently a 22-year-old Army specialist east of Kabul this week. All of this comes as the government makes overtures to seek peace with the Taliban.

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