NPR

Arizona Teachers End Walkout But Vow To Keep Fighting: 'Now We Must Win The War'

Educators aren't satisfied with the pay bump passed Thursday, but after it was signed, they announced they would return to class — roughly a week after their massive statewide walkout began.

The wide lawns outside the state Capitol appeared Thursday morning much as they have for about a week: overflowing with a sea of educators, clad in red and toting bold-lettered signs.

Yet the mood among the crowd of teachers who had walked out of their classrooms — for so long seeped through with frustration and anger — showed tinges of a different feeling altogether: joy.

That's because after 13 hours of. The protest's leaders had to head back to class if the raise was signed into law, about how that pay bump would affect school funding.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR3 min readPolitics
Iran's Ayatollah Slams 'American Clowns' In Rare Friday Prayers Sermon
"These American clowns lie" when they say they stand with the Iranian people, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei told a large crowd of worshippers in Tehran.
NPR2 min readTech
FBI Seizes Website Suspected Of Selling Access To Billions Of Pieces Of Stolen Data
The site weleakinfo.com is now down. The Justice Department says that for a fee, users could access stolen personal data names, phone numbers, e-mail addresses. Two people were arrested in Europe.
NPR3 min read
On Their Debut Album, Stretch And Bobbito Are Taking 'No Requests'
NPR's Audie Cornish talks with longtime DJs and producers Stretch Armstrong and Bobbito Garcia about their debut album, No Requests, loaded with new renditions of some of their favorite songs.