The Guardian

How Cape Town was saved from running out of water

Reusing shower water, limiting toilet flushing and night-time irrigation were among measures that saved South Africa’s second city from running dry
Township children celebrate Cape Town’s temporary victory over drought. Photograph: Mike Hutchings/Reuters

Late last year, as the South African government faced the prospect of its largest city running out of water, they took an unprecedented gamble.

The government announced “day zero” – a moment when dam levels would be so low that they would turn off the taps in Cape Town and send people to communal water collection points.

This apocalyptic notion prompted water stockpiling and panic, caused a drop in tourism bookings, and raised the spectre of civil unrest.

It also worked. After years of trying to convince residents to conserve, the aggressive campaign jolted people into action. Water use was (and still is) restricted to 50 litres per person per day. (In 2016, average

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