NPR

From Collards To Maple Syrup, How Your Identity Impacts The Food You Like

When people are reminded of their cultural roots, the food representing that culture tastes better. Scientists could harness that food and identity association to help people eat more healthfully.
If you're Southern, the macaroni and cheese with collard greens may taste better to you than to someone from another culture. Source: Glasshouse Images

Canadian-born psychologist Jay Van Bavel likes Canadian beer.

"I can't say what it is," he says, laughing, "I just love the taste."

When Van Bavel sips a beer from his hometown, there is a feedback between his taste buds and his brain. He's reminded of his Canadian-ness, he feels more Canadian, and Canadian beer tastes better to him than other beers.

So suggests a recent in the , authored by , social psychologist at New York University and his colleagues. The researchers found that the stronger your sense of social

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR3 min readPolitics
Latinx Voters In Texas Set To Play Key Role In 2020 Election
The Latinx vote is still up for grabs by both parties in Texas. A new report from the University of Houston’s Center for Mexican American Studies shows the decisive role this voting bloc could play in the 2020 presidential election. Latinx — a gender
NPR4 min read
Bill Bryson's Latest Is A Different Kind Of Journey — Into 'The Body'
Bryson is beloved for his travel writing, but in his new book he's undertaking an interior journey, looking at everything from medical oddities to the amazing way your body fights off most cancers.
NPR2 min readPolitics
Biden Takes On Trump With A Sweeping Ethics Plan, Amid Push Back Over Ukraine
Joe Biden is taking aim at President Trump over ethics, as the president continues attacks on the candidate and his son. Hunter Biden is now pledging to curtail his overseas business dealings.