Bloomberg Businessweek

Why Japan’s Automakers Are Finally Recruiting Women

A labor shortage forces car companies to seek more female engineers
Mitsuhashi is project leader for Osaka University’s Formula Racing Club

The story of Yui Mitsuhashi illustrates the bind that Japan’s carmakers find themselves in as the country struggles with its worst labor shortage in decades. Captain of a team that builds race cars at prestigious Osaka University, the 24-year-old engineering student would be among the most prized recruits for Toyota Motor Corp. or Nissan Motor Co.—if only she wanted to work for them. But as much as she loves cars, she isn’t sure she wants to spend her life in the industry, which has a reputation for long hours and big gender imbalances.

“People are always telling me, ‘You could go to any company you want,’” Mitsuhashi says,

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