The Atlantic

The Enduring Appeal of the Fairy-Tale Wedding

Even in this modern age, many brides still just want to feel like princesses.
Source: Toby Melville / Reuters / The Atlantic

On Saturday, millions of people around the world will tune in to watch a fairy tale. A prince will marry his beloved and, together, they’ll parade through the streets in a horse-drawn carriage, waving—royally—to thousands of adoring subjects as they pass.

The royal wedding is a global phenomenon. An estimated 2 people Prince William marry Kate Middleton; in 1981, 750 million watched Prince Charles Diana Spencer. Since Prince Harry’s engagement to Meghan Markle was announced in November, royal-enthusiasts have been readying themselves for the big day, planning viewing parties and buying up all manner of Harry and Meghan : plates, mugs, coloring books, life-size cardboard cutouts, even novelty condoms”). Four million people are to travel to England for the event.

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