Entertainment Weekly

AMERICAN CRIME STORY

WITH A MYSTERY SURROUNDING THE GRUESOME MURDER OF AN 11-YEAR-OLD BOY, STEPHEN KING’S NEW NOVEL THE OUTSIDER IS POISED TO BE SUMMER’S SPOOKIEST READ.

AFTER THE ARREST AT THE BASEBALL FIELD THERE WAS NO POSSIBILITY OF RALPH PLAYING THE GOOD COP IN A GOOD COP/BAD COP SCENARIO, SO HE SIMPLY STOOD LEANING AGAINST THE WALL OF THE INTERVIEW ROOM, LOOKING ON.

HE WAS PREPARED FOR ANOTHER OF THOSE ACCUSING stares, but Terry only glanced at him briefly, and with no expression at all, before turning his attention to Bill Samuels, who had taken a seat in one of the three chairs on the other side of the table.

Studying Samuels now, Ralph began to get an idea of how he had risen so high so quickly. While the two of them were standing on the other side of the one-way glass, the DA had simply looked a bit young for the job. Now, facing Frankie Peterson’s rapist and killer, he looked even younger, like a law office intern who had (due to some mixup, probably) landed this interview with a big-time perp. Even the little Alfalfa cowlick sticking up from the back of his head added to the role the man had slipped into: untried youth, just happy to be here. You can tell me anything, said those wide, interested eyes, because I’ll believe it. This is my first time playing with the big boys, and I just don’t

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