Los Angeles Times

Sports gambling may be coming to California — but it's unclear who will take your bets

If there is one sure bet Californians can make now that the Supreme Court has cleared the way for legalized sports gambling, it's this: Months, if not years, of haggling lie ahead before residents can wager a dime on any game.

And that haggling could be a spectacle in itself as tribal casinos, card clubs and racetracks get into a likely expensive political brawl over the right to the millions of dollars of revenue sports gambling will generate.

"You can expect lots of money to be spent," said Jennifer Roberts, a former gaming lawyer and associate director of the International Center for Gaming Regulation at the University of Nevada in Las Vegas.

A decision last week by the Supreme Court, in a case involving a New Jersey effort to legalize sports betting, opened

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