Popular Science

Caught in a race against climate change, lizards hit an evolutionary dead end

The brown anole has little room left to evolve.
A Cuban brown anole

A Cuban brown anole.

Charlesjsharp

Brown anoles are one of the most successful species on the planet. These resilient creatures have settled throughout a large portion of the Western Hemisphere, even landing in such distant places as Hawaii and Singapore by hitching rides across the Pacific in shipments of ornamental plants. In the southeastern United States, they are actually displacing native green anoles, driving them higher into the trees. These cold-blooded creatures are happy almost anywhere, from shady forests to sun-drenched beaches.

“In The Bahamas, it would blow your mind how common these things are,” said Michael Logan, a post-doctoral fellow at the in Panama, who studies them. “Pick any bush along the side of the road, look closely, and I’ll bet the bank

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