NPR

New Studies Confirm A Surge In Coal Miners' Disease

Confirming what NPR reported in 2016, new studies show the rate of the advanced stage of the deadly disease black lung growing in central Appalachia, including more demand for lung transplants.
The rate of the advanced stage of the deadly disease black lung is growing in central Appalachia, according to a new study. Source: Tyler Stableford

More coal miners in central Appalachia have suffered the advanced stages of the deadly disease black lung than previous government research has found, and more miners working in the region today have earlier stages of the disease.

Those are two of the findings in a bundle of studies released Tuesday and expected to be released soon, which focus on the epidemic of black lung disease first reported by NPR in 2016.

"It does really underscore that this is a real phenomenon," says Kirsten discussed Tuesday at a San Diego conference of the American Thoracic Society.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR2 min read
3 Are Dead And 4 Hospitalized From Drug Overdoses, Pittsburgh Police Say
All the victims were wearing orange wristbands and are believed to have attended the same event Saturday night, but authorities say they overdosed afterward at a private residence.
NPR4 min read
A Boy And A Pup Come To One Another's Rescue In 'The Dog Who Lost His Bark'
The Dog Who Lost His Bark is a story in two halves, says author Eoin Colfer: "In the first half the boy heals the dog, and in the second half the dog heals the boy." It's illustrated by P.J. Lynch.
NPR2 min readScience
Hundreds Attend Funeral For Pizol, A Disappearing Glacier
On Sunday, more than 200 people paid their respects at a ceremony to mark the "death" of the glacier in the Swiss Alps. Researchers say it's disappearing due to rising temperatures.