The Atlantic

Uber’s Self-Driving Car Didn’t Malfunction, It Was Just Bad

There were no software glitches or sensor breakdowns that led to a fatal crash, merely poor object recognition, emergency planning, system design, testing methodology, and human operation.
Source: National Transportation Safety Board

On March 18, at 9:58 p.m., a self-driving Uber car killed Elaine Herzberg. The vehicle was driving itself down an uncomplicated road in suburban Tempe, Arizona, when it hit her. Herzberg, who was walking across the mostly empty street, was the first pedestrian killed by an autonomous vehicle.

The report on the incident, released on Thursday, shows that Herzberg died

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