NPR

Asteroid Impact That Wiped Out The Dinosaurs Also Caused Abrupt Global Warming

The crash of the space rock that slammed into the Yucatan Peninsula also warmed up the Earth's atmosphere for 100,000 years. And scientists say it's a cautionary tale for people living today.
An artist's rendering of the Chicxulub impact crater on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula from an asteroid that slammed into the planet some 65 million years ago. Source: SPL

The asteroid impact that ended the age of the dinosaurs also released so much carbon dioxide into the atmosphere that the planet warmed up by about 5 degrees Celsius — and the hot spell persisted for roughly 100,000 years.

That's according to a new in the journal that offers a cautionary tale about how Earth's climate will react to the carbon dioxide that's being pumped into the atmosphere now by the burning of

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR4 min readPolitics
In South Korea, Anguish Over Deaths Of North Korean Defectors Who May Have Starved
A mother and her young son were found dead in July, apparently of starvation. The case has refocused attention on the circumstances of defectors, who often struggle to start new lives in the South.
NPR6 min read
'There Isn't Just One Type Of Black,' Says Comedian Nicole Byer
The rising comedy star and host of the Emmy-nominated cooking competition Nailed It! has gone to therapy weekly, escaped grief on stage and taught herself to do her own makeup for television.
NPR4 min read
'Red At The Bone' Cuts Close To The Bone
Jacqueline Woodson's exquisitely wrought new novel follows two black families of different classes whose lives become intertwined when their only children conceive a child together in their teens.