NPR

Great White Sharks Have A Secret 'Cafe,' And They Led Scientists Right To It

These sharks have a hidden life that's becoming a lot less hidden, thanks to a scientific expedition that was years in the making.
The scientists tagged great white sharks during the fall and hoped they would arrive in the offshore area during their visit. Source: Courtesy Stanford University — Block Lab Hopkins Marine Station

Great white sharks have a "hidden life" that's becoming a lot less hidden thanks to a scientific expedition years in the making.

Scientists used to think the apex predators moved up and down the western coast of North America, snacking in waters with lots of food close to shore. Almost 20 years ago, Stanford marine biologist Barbara Block started putting tags on the sharks that could track their movements.

She and other researchers noticed something surprising — the tags showed that the sharks were moving away from

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR6 min readPolitics
Face Recognition Lets Palestinians Cross Israeli Checkposts Fast, But Raises Concerns
Israel has begun using the technology at its West Bank checkpoints to verify Palestinians' identities as they cross into Israel. The new system means shorter wait times but is drawing criticism.
NPR4 min readSociety
In Vermont, A Case Of One Man Whose Gun Was Seized Under Red Flag Law
While the political focus may be on mass shootings, states are far more often using red flag laws to prevent cases of individual gun violence, including suicide.
NPR5 min readScience
Scientists Attempt Controversial Experiment To Edit DNA In Human Sperm Using CRISPR
NPR visited the only lab in the world known to be trying to use the powerful gene-editing tool CRISPR to modify the DNA in human sperm. If successful, it could be used to prevent genetic disorders.