The Atlantic

Stop Penalizing Boys for Not Being Able to Sit Still at School

Instead, help them channel their energy into productive tasks.
Source: Library of Congress

This year's end-of-year paper purge in my middle school office revealed a startling pattern in my teaching practices: I discipline boys far more often than I discipline girls. Flipping through the pink and yellow slips—my school's system for communicating errant behavior to students, advisors, and parents—I found that I gave out nearly twice as many of these warnings to boys than I did to girls, and of the slips I handed out to boys, all but one was for disruptive classroom behavior.

The most frustrating moments I have had this year stemmed from these battles over—and for—my male students' attention. This spring, as the grass greened up on the soccer fields and the New Hampshire air finally rose above freezing, lost in the end.

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