The Atlantic

I Talked to Zionists—Then I Was Disinvited by a Major Muslim Group

The decision marks the culmination of a years-long campaign by some online activists and religious leaders to limit the range of voices at such events.
Source: Stephen J. Carrera / AP

On Tuesday, I was disinvited from the 55th annual conference of the Islamic Society of North America, which proclaims itself one of the leading American Muslim organizations. My crimes? Talking to Zionists, writing an article about it, and thanking God for a bowel movement.

In a one-page letter, the program committee chair wrote that “our Muslim speakers” are “expected to support broadly our values,” including “our community’s support for the Palestinian people of all faith traditions, in their struggle against occupation and dispossession.” He added that he found my “recent work … troubling.” He also objected to my “continued use of language referencing Allah in manners not befitting His Majesty, whether in jest or otherwise.”

The proximate trigger for the letter appears to have been my story in ’s June issue, “.” But it marks the

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