Popular Science

Why scientific evidence won't change the minds of Loch Ness monster true believers

To handle potential discomforting thoughts, people rationalize their thoughts and actions.
plastic loch-ness monster in water

If you’re convinced Nessie’s real, would science unconvince you?

AP Photo/Norm Goldstein

You may have noticed a curious recent announcement: An international research team plans to use state-of-the-art DNA testing to establish once and for all whether the Loch Ness monster exists.

Regardless of the results, it’s unlikely the test will change the mind of anyone who firmly believes in Nessie’s existence. As a philosopher working on the notion of evidence and knowledge, I still consider the scientists’ efforts to be valuable. Moreover, this episode can illustrate something important about how people think more generally about evidence and science.

Discounting discomfiting evidence

Genomicist , who will lead the international research team in Scotland, says he looks forward to “.” The team plans to collect and identify free-floating DNA from creatures living in the testing results will most likely not convince everyone.

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