The Guardian

Uber's plans to identify drunk passengers could endanger women | Emily Reynolds

The company’s poor track record when it comes to sexual assault makes its new AI project a scary prospect
‘Allowing drivers to identify vulnerable, drunk and potentially lone passengers could be incredibly dangerous.’ Photograph: Alamy

It’s impossible to say exactly how much money Uber makes from drunk people, but if the number of bleary-eyed people wandering around on Friday and Saturday nights trying to find their summoned cars is anything to go by, it’s probably quite a lot. The company clearly knows its audience: this week, it applied for a patent for an AI that could spot drunk or high passengers simply by the way they walked, typed or held their phone.

According to the patent,

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