NPR

When Leaving Your Religion Means Losing Your Children

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish women who have left or are trying to leave the faith often confront long-drawn out child custody battles over their decision to no longer practice their religion.

Chavie Weisberger was raised in an ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Monsey, N.Y., and was forced to marry a man she barely knew when she was 19. The couple had three children, but when she began to question her faith and sexuality, she and her husband divorced – and she almost lost her children.

The case is highlighting how New York courts handle divorce and custody issues for the state's large ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. While Weisberger's case was reversed on appeal last August – she has now regained full custody of her children – it brings to light the issues that

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