NPR

Teaching Children To Ask The Big Questions Without Religion

Religion offers answers to big questions about life and death, right and wrong, and who we are. But some unaffiliated parents are finding power in not knowing those answers.
The Freeman family. Source: Courtesy of Nathan Freeman

Emily Freeman, a writer in Montana, grew up unaffiliated to a religion — culturally Jewish on her father's side, a smattering of churchgoing on her mother's. She and her husband Nathan Freeman talked about not identifying as religious — but they didn't really discuss how it would affect their parenting.

"I think we put it in the big basket of things that we figured we had so much time to think about," Emily joked.

But then they had kids, and the kids came home

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR6 min readSociety
It's Not Just Insulin: Diabetes Patients Struggle To Get Crucial Supplies
Type 1 diabetes can be well managed with insulin if blood sugar is consistently monitored. But insurance rules can make it hard for patients to get the medical supplies their doctors say they need.
NPR3 min readHappiness
In 'Savage Gods,' An Author Finds That Pondering Being Leads To An Inability To Write
Paul Kingsnorth moved to a small farm in Ireland to be closer to the land and to reconnect with the essence of being. Instead of contentment, he found that it was tough to find meaning in writing.
NPR3 min readSociety
Democratic Donor Ed Buck Accused Of Running A Drug Den After A 3rd Man ODs
For more than two years, activists say, Buck has avoided being charged with a crime because he is white, wealthy and politically connected.