NPR

It's Easier To Call A Fact A Fact When It's One You Like, Study Finds

The Pew Research Center looked at Americans' ability to identify factual statements as opposed to opinion statements. Success rates varied significantly, they found — and partisan bias played a role.
Researchers say people are more likely to call a fact a fact if it fits with their partisan beliefs. Source: Leigh Wells

Study after study has found that partisan beliefs and bias shape what we believe is factually true.

Now the Pew Research Center has released a new study that takes a step back. They wondered: How good are Americans at telling a factual statement from an opinion statement — if they don't have to acknowledge the factual statement is ?

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR6 min read
Thundercat On 'It Is What It Is,' Losing Mac Miller And Learning To Do Nothing
The collaboration-loving bassist said "It's hard to see clearly through the pain of losing him," when asked about the death of close friend Mac Miller. That loss permeates his fourth studio album.
NPR3 min read
U.S. May Get More Ventilators But Run Out Of Medicine For COVID-19 Patients
There have been dramatic spikes in demand for sedatives, pain medications, paralytics, and other drugs that are crucial for patients who are on ventilators.
NPR2 min readSociety
CDC Unveils 1st National Coronavirus Pandemic Tracking System
The federal agency will start producing a weekly update based on testing and reports from doctors and hospitals around the country of people being getting pneumonia and diagnosed with COVID-19.