NPR

When The White House Can't Be Believed

President Trump's order changing policy on separating children from their parents at the border may dampen the outrage factor. But NPR's David Folkenflik says the disbelief factor will endure.
Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen speaks Monday during a White House news briefing about children being separated from their parents who enter the U.S. illegally. Source: Alex Wong

This essay isn't about spin, or splitting hairs, or differing opinions.

This involves a reality check about our expectations of the people who act in our name. About credibility at the highest levels of our government. About people whose words are heard abroad as speaking for our nation. About the public and the media that try, however imperfectly, to serve it.

On Monday, reporters Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen at a news conference held at the White House. They grilled her on the government's policy of separating young children from parents seeking asylum after crossing the U.S. border with Mexico.

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