Fortune

WHERE AUTISTIC WORKERS THRIVE

People on the autism spectrum are making big contributions to Fortune 500 companies.
Anthony Moffa, a software engineer at Chase, was diagnosed with autism at age 48.

IT’S HARD getting a job when you’re autistic. If you don’t look people in the eye when you talk, they dismiss you.

Social interaction and communication skills can be a challenge for people with autism spectrum disorder, but companies looking to hire untapped talent for tech-related jobs are discovering that those with autism are unusually detail-oriented, highly analytical, and able to focus intensely on tasks, making them valuable employees.

Last October, six companies—Ford Motor, DXC Technology, EY, Microsoft,

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