Nautilus

When It’s Good to Be Antisocial

It turns out that, even in a highly coordinated hive, antisocial individuals persist.“Wanderer above the sea of fog,” by Caspar David Friedrich (1817)

ees are emblems of social complexity. Their honeycombs—intricate lattices dripping with food—house bustling hive members carrying out carefully orchestrated duties like defending against predators and coordinating resource collection. Much of our own success is due to this sort of division of labor. Clearly, in. You could be forgiven for assuming that complex social organization is the—or at least a—pinnacle of evolution.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Nautilus

Nautilus10 min read
We Are All Ancient Mapmakers: Why we still see the world like the mathematician and poet who first mapped it.
In the first half of the sixth century B.C., a Greek man named Anaximander, born in Turkey, sketched the world in a way no one had previously thought to do. It featured a circle, divided into three equal parts. He labeled those parts Europe, Asia, an
Nautilus8 min read
There’s No Homunculus In Our Brain Who Guides Us: Why the cognitive-map theory is misguided.
In the early 1980s, the psychologist Harry Heft put a 16 mm camera in the back of a sports car and made a movie. It consisted of a continuous shot of a residential neighborhood in Granville, Ohio, where Heft was a professor at Denison University. It
Nautilus5 min readPsychology
Why We Love to Be Grossed Out
Nina Strohminger, perhaps not unlike many fans of raunchy comedies and horror flicks, is drawn to disgust. The University of Pennsylvania psychologist has written extensively on the feeling of being grossed out, and where it comes from. The dominant