The Atlantic

Is Colonizing Mars the Most Important Project in Human History?

The Red Planet is a freezing, faraway, uninhabitable desert. But protecting the human species from the end of life on Earth could save trillions of lives.
Source: NASA / Reuters

The Earth and Mars are a bit like fraternal twins that slowly grew apart. Four billion years ago, , sheathed by protective atmospheres, and carved with rivers and pools of liquid water. But today, Mars is an irradiated desert enveloped by a thick miasma of carbon dioxide, while its twin is a sensationally fertile orb and, for

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